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Food Waste News Packaged Food Products Sustainability

Introducing the First to Market Climate-Friendly Eggs

Blue Sky Family Farms, is a brand creating humane, ethical eggs, with their latest egg innovation being a line of free-range, pasture-raised eggs sustainably farmed with regenerative practices, that will debut on store shelves nationwide beginning August 10, called Helpful Hens

It’s a big step towards climate-friendly agriculture products, as the brand’s continues their efforts to research and implement regenerative techniques that create a vibrant ecosystem for its hens to flourish.

The Helpful Hens product line will include four styles of eggs – Pasture Raised Organic, Pasture Raised Non-GMO, Free Range Non-GMO, and Free Range Organic – all coming from hens that are raised in complete support of their natural behaviors, all while sustaining efforts to restore the earth to its most organic state.

Regenerative farming is a boost to sustainable efforts in food production, with techniques being implemented Blue Sky Farms showing as the following: 

  • Practices that create a rich environment for plants, pollinators, and hens to thrive, including careful planning of nutrient-rich cover crops and trees to help absorb carbon while purifying the air.
  • Implementing a three-tiered vegetation program in the pasture including grasses, shrubs, and trees, allowing for carbon sequestration to occur at multiple elevations in the pasture.
  • Twenty species of diverse vegetation that will allow healthy interactions between plants and animals, and shade for hens.
  • Frequent testing of soil and bird behavior as a form of measurement to determine benchmarks for its regenerative practices and performance metrics for future farms.
Categories
Deals Entrepreneurship Food Waste Restaurants Sustainability Technology

Groundbreaking App Lets You Rescue $15+ Worth Of Food For Just 6 Bucks

Photo: Les Kaner // Too Good To Go

Food waste has persisted as a global problem that many companies are trying to find solutions for. Upcycled foods and waste reduction are two industries that have formed to combat excess food waste, but 1.4 billion tons still gets tossed every year, the majority of which is at home or at restaurants.

On the restaurant end, there’s a large network of connected local restaurants called Too Good To Go that’s striving to make a massive impact on rescuing food that would otherwise go to waste.

Photo courtesy of Too Good To Go

Consumers can tap into this network via the Too Good To Go app, which allows them to reserve “Surprise Bags” from spots around them that are in the system for $5-$6. What you get in return is approximately $15 worth of food that the restaurant would have otherwise thrown out.

Overall, the restaurant wins by making a little extra money off of food they would’ve lost, you get to score on a massive discount for some food, and Too Good To Go profits slightly off of the cost of the bag. Pretty much, everybody benefits, including the planet, as food waste is cut and helps lower waste and resulting greenhouse gas emissions.

It’s not just restaurants that you can get food from, however, as Too Good To Go partners with restaurants, bakeries, supermarkets, and hotels. Currently, they’re linked with 75,000 different spots worldwide.

Photo courtesy of Too Good To Go

Too Good To Go, founded in 2016, is currently in the midst of a massive push to expand globally. They’ve recently made a debut in San Francisco, and can also be seen in New York City, Chicago, Austin, and other metropolises worldwide.

It’s one of the biggest ways to fight against food waste, and it pretty much works the same for a customer as a food delivery app would. Sure, there’s a lot more we can do at home to combat food waste too, but this is a pretty convenient way to get started.

Categories
Food Waste Plant-Based Sustainability Technology

Introducing The World’s First 3D-Printed Compostable Coffee Pods

Within the US, over half of the population drinks coffee. That’s 150 million people getting their caffeine fix, and typically at a three cup per day average. Additionally, single-use coffee pods have become a popular choice for caf-fiends with 41% of Americans owning a single-cup coffee maker.

Great for productivity, but not so awesome for our environment, over 50 billion paper cups are thrown away within the U.S. each year. It’s even said that discarded coffee pods, which are made of aluminum and plastic, could circle the entire globe a staggering 10 times. Despite this level of massive waste, coffee popularity shows no signs of slowing down.  

To help combat coffee consumption waste, forward-thinking company NEXE Innovations has created the world’s first compostable single-use coffee pods. Founded in 2015, NEXE Innovations uses 3D-printing to design, prototype and patent the pods, offering a sustainable option for eco-conscious coffee lovers. The idea came through a desire to replace non-biodegradable plastic. Spending six years in development, the company is now a leader in plant-based manufacturing. Their first commercial product is aptly-named the NEXEpod.

“Through continued trial and error, we have developed a pod that can consistently withstand the heat and pressure of a Keurig coffee brewing system while also being plant-based, fully compostable and still provides the freshness and great taste that our consumers expect from a good cup of coffee. To be able to provide these qualities and do so in batches of thousands of pods at a time has been a very difficult process and a definite engineering feat,” says Ash Guglani, President of NEXE Innovations.

The company currently uses 3D-printing technology to quickly design the NEXEpods, moving from design to concept in under a day. They now have most of the necessary equipment to produce over 230 million of the bamboo and corn based pods per year.

Introduced earlier this year, XOMA Superfoods is the company’s in-house coffee and superfoods brand. Created as a vehicle to deliver high quality coffee and superfoods to market, XOMA also helps to ensure NEXE adheres to their sustainability goals. The first product offered was a soluble micro-ground coffee blend fortified in MCT-oil and packaged in the NEXEpod. Since then, they’ve expanded to offer additional options like their Keto and Mushroom coffees, each of which can be ordered online

Moving forward, NEXE Innovations plans to continue expanding their proprietary coffee and superfoods lines into conscious coffee consumers. Only available on their website and Amazon currently, the company hopes to achieve Amazon Prime status soon. They’re also in talks with various other online platforms that cater to plant-based and coffee enthusiasts.

Categories
Alcohol Beer Food Policy Science Sustainability

Finnish Brewery Showing How All Waste, Even Goose Poop, Can Be Used To Make Beer

Photo courtesy of Ant Brew and Lahti European Green Capital

Each year, the European Commission designates one city as the “Green Capital of Europe” in recognition of their efforts towards sustainability. 2021’s Green Capital is Lahti, Finland, where 99% of the town’s household waste is already repurposed.

To show just how far you can go to reutilize waste to make other things, Lahti brewery Ant Brew has created a line of “Wasted Potential” summer craft brews that all use waste, ranging from fruit pulps to goose poop.

Photo courtesy of Ant Brew and Lahti European Green Capital

The goose poop won’t actually go into the beer (although the fruit pulp will), but is instead being used in a food-safe way to smoke the malt used to make one of Ant Brew’s waste-inspired beers. That particular stout will help local parks get cleaner by removing goose droppings from the premises.

Also in the lineup is a witbier that is brewed with orange peels from a local market’s juice pressing station, imbued with fruit purees just past their best by date but still great as an ingredient for beer.

Other ingredients that will be used in the Wasted Potential Beers include roadside weeds, wild herbs, and mosses.

Photo courtesy of Ant Brew and Lahti European Green Capital

While only Finnish folk will be able to drink this beer once it’s released for the summer, the entire world can take a lesson from what Ant Brew and Lahti are doing in the brewing realm.

The biggest takeaway here is that if you really put your mind to it and get creative, virtually any waste can be repurposed to make something unique and useable.

Categories
Culture Sustainability

Experience Tasmania, The Next Untapped Food Frontier

Here in the states, when you think of Tasmania, you’re probably more likely to be reminded of a cartoon character rather than the actual place. Even more odd, the Tasmanian Devil cartoon character was named after an actual animal that looks completely different. It makes you wonder how much we really know about Tasmania.

Did you know that it’s the world’s 26th largest island? Tasmania also has some of the cleanest air in the world which helps produce pristine rainwater and super fertile soil. And in addition to devils, Tasmania is rich with a wide assortment of native animal and plant species, familiar and unfamiliar. Also, products from Tasmania benefit from a culture and industry that’s rooted in environmental sustainability, quality control and strict biosecurity.

Experience Tasmania is a campaign that was created to highlight the unique treasures Tasmania has to offer the food and beverage world. Presented with a challenge during the pandemic, the state was forced to think of a new way to trade and export. Through Experience Tasmania, a network of potential customers and top chefs were able to enjoy some of the Australian state’s leading producers and produce. This has helped a growing appreciation towards Tasmanian gourmet products.

Already world renowned for its meat, seafood and dairy, in recent years, the demand for Tasmanian products has expanded to include wine, liquor and produce. This has further solidified the island state’s reputation for quality. A strong demand for Tasmanian imports held fast even during the covid-19 crisis. Besides the novelty of trying imported foods, another attractive quality is that all Tasmanian products are GMO free and do not use hormone probitants or antibiotics to encourage artificial growth.

If you’re into quality meats, Cape Grim Beef comes from one of the purest environments for raising grass-fed cattle. They have a collective of beef-farmers that are committed to ethical practices and even have a third-party auditor to ensure top quality.

Champagne lovers will no doubt enjoy Jansz Tasmania, respectfully distinguished as “sparkling wine”. Considered a pioneer in luxury sparkling wine, Jansz is handcrafted and originates from the heart of Pipers River in Tasmania’s Tamar Valley.

Speaking of wine, it’s only right that I mention King Island Dairy, one of Australia’s favorite cheese brands. King Island is located in Bass Strait, between Tasmania and mainland Australia. They have award winning cheese that’s sourced from a handful of local farmers, really a perfect wine compliment.

Another quality product is considered the “Wagyu of the Sea” due to its juicy marbling. The ocean trout from Petuna, Tasmania’s leading fishery, is one of many quality fishes offered. The fishery has been around for 70 years, practices sustainable aquaculture, and maintains its commitment to respecting the longevity of the natural environment.

As the world gradually returns to normal, it will be interesting to see more people become further exposed to Tasmania’s food frontier and culture. These products and more are increasingly available from local US distributors, retailers, and restaurants around the nation.

If you’re a commercial buyer or distributor and interested in Tasmanian products, you can contact Trade Tasmania directly to get your hands on some.

Categories
Science Sustainability

Slaughter-Free, Cell-Cultured Chicken Set To Debut In The USA This Year

Photo courtesy of Upside Foods

For years, we’ve been getting teasers of what lab-grown meat could look like, with videos and commentary on cell-cultured meatballs, fried chicken, and more promising a future where meat could be made without killing animals.

That future could take a monumental step forward this year, as Memphis Meats, which just changed its name to Upside Foods, announced that it plans to debut a cell-cultured chicken in the USA by the end of 2021.

Photo courtesy of Upside Foods

Upside’s product, called Upside Chicken, is made by taking a sample of chicken cells and placing it in a nutrient-rich environment. The cells have everything they need to grow on their own and develop into chicken meat.

Claims that Upside makes about this chicken is that it could have a massive impact from a sustainability point, and also limits bacterial contamination since the meat is “cultivated in a clean facility from cell to harvest.” The company is also working with the USDA and the FDA to ensure quality standards of production are met.

Photo courtesy of Upside Foods

Similar to a plant-based meat purveyor like Impossible Foods or Beyond Meat, Upside’s goal is to limit the environmental impact of modern meat production. Instead of taking out meat entirely, however, Upside is using a slaughter-free method that makes the exact same chicken we all know and readily consume.

Pending regulatory approval, Upside plans to launch their chicken product by the end of the year, although no official launch date has been confirmed as of yet. Upside has confirmed to Foodbeast, however, that the plan is to debut their cultured meat in restaurants first.

What we do know, however, is that previous studies have shown that at least a third of Americans are open to trying the product, meaning there is a market and a possibility that cultured meat weaves itself into the future of how we produce and eat meat.

Categories
Fast Food Plant-Based Sustainability

Taco Bell Tests New ‘Cravetarian’ Plant-Based Protein Option

While Taco Bell has some upcoming plans with Beyond Meat, that hasn’t stopped them from trying to make their own plant-based proteins.

Through April 29th, the chain is testing a “Cravetarian” ground beef substitute that’s made from a blend of pea and chickpea protein. It’s served up just like a classic Taco Supreme, with sour cream, lettuce, tomatoes, and cheese.

According to a release from Taco Bell, this taco contains 10 less calories than a standard Taco Supreme (180 vs 190), but no other nutritional or sustainability benefits are noted. Since this is just a test, were this to go nationwide, we would be likely to get more specific info.

Taco Bell has dabbled in proprietary plant-based substitutes in the past, including an “Oatrageous Taco” in parts of Europe. However, this represents part of a broader initiative where the chain is going all in on having more sustainable options.

Foodbeast was able to try the Cravetarian Taco ahead of its test launch, and found it difficult to differentiate from a standard Supreme Taco. Flavor and texture wise, things are there, and the spices do a decent job of masking any potential taste that the pea or chickpea might provide. Overall, it’s a solid option for vegetarians and non-vegetarians that’s meant as more of an environmental statement than a health food.

Taco Bell’s Cravetarian Taco will be available through April 29th at a single location (14042 Red Hill Avenue, Tustin, California) in Orange County. The individual taco costs $2.19, but you can also swap it into other items for no extra cost.

Categories
Fast Food Sustainability

Taco Bell Is Launching Program To Recycle Their Sauce Packets This Year

Photo courtesy of Taco Bell

In one of its biggest efforts to date to be more climate-friendly, Taco Bell has found a way to make all of its sauce packets recyclable. This could potentially take billions of pieces of plastic out of landfills annually.

For context, Taco Bell claims that 8.2 billion sauce packets are used in the United States each year. All of these pieces of plastic are currently not recyclable, and the taco titan doesn’t plan on switching materials.

However, a new partnership with recycling company TerraCycle will help convert the sauce packets. TerraCycle, which runs the Loop recycling service many global brands subscribe to, specializes in taking materials that normally aren’t recyclable and converting them into hard plastic.

Taco Bell and TerraCycle will launch the pilot program for their sauce packets later this year, and consumers will be able to participate in a yet-to-be announced method that will include free shipping. The hope is that this will help convert all of the chain’s sauce packet plastic waste by 2025, a long-term goal for Taco Bell.