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Culture Hit-Or-Miss Video

‘Velveting’ May Be The Secret To Cooking Great Chinese Food At Home

If you’ve ever tried to recapture the magic of Chinese food at home, but fell just a tad short from the perfect dish, there might just be a reason for that.

According to GrubStreet, there’s actually a technique most people don’t know about that’s supposed to bring out the best possible flavor in Chinese cooking. No, it’s not MSG.

Called velveting, the technique is said to make the meat in Chinese food soft and tender.

To try this, you’ll need some egg white, cornstarch, and rice wine. Just marinate your meat in the mixture and refrigerate it for about 30 minutes. Then, blanche the meat in boiling water or hot oil for about thirty seconds. Finally, remove from the heat and start cooking your proteins in the way you would before that extra step.

It makes us wonder what other ancient cooking secrets of the world are out there. Our carne asada tacos have been missing that extra ‘umph’ of flavor. And don’t get us started on our sub-par tonkotsu broth.

I’m gonna have to try this velveting technique out over the weekend. For science. Chinese take out really adds up, y’know.

Categories
Cravings Culture News Restaurants

World’s First Michelin-Starred Ramen Is Coming To Singapore

mstar-ramen-ns

A tiny nine-seater noodle shop in Tokyo, Japan made international headlines in December 2015 after earning a star from the highly respected Michelin Guide. Next month, Japanese Soba Noodles Tsuta, the first and only Michelin-starred ramen eatery in the world, will open its first branch in Singapore.

Tsuta Singapore is aiming to duplicate the success of the original store in Tokyo which sees a long queue of customers hours before it opens. Tickets are sold to patrons as early as 6 a.m. which are then quickly sold out by 8 a.m., three hours before the 11 a.m. opening.

A variety of soup bases are available to choose from: shoyu soba which features a soy broth; shio soba, which has a salty broth made from Okinawan sea salt; and miso.

Founded by ramen master Yuki Onishi, the Soba Noodles Tsuta noodle shop is home to meals prepared with freshly-made noodles and carefully selected ingredients. He is set to oversee the Singapore branch to ensure that similar standards are maintained, reports the Straits Times.

According to Michelin Singapore, the proposal to expand the business in Singapore began with one stranger’s message on Facebook. It read: “We would love to tell the world about your ramen. Have you ever thought about opening a restaurant outside of Japan…in Singapore?”

Chef Onishi recalled what piqued his interest, “I had never particularly thought of expanding abroad, but what distinguished the Singapore partner was simply the fact that he came, got in line, and actually ate my food. The other people who said they were interested in Tsuta didn’t do that.”

The partner from Singapore turned out to be from the same firm that partnered with the one-Michelin-starred Hong Kong dim sum chain Tim Ho Wan.

The new Soba Noodles Tsuta, which is set to house 18 seats, will be situated at the Pacific Plaza, at the heart of Singapore’s shopping district.

Written by Ryan General | NextShark

Categories
Cravings Culture Hit-Or-Miss News

There’s Now A Pizza Camp For Adults… And You Thought Your Camp Was Perfect

pizza-camp-cover

If you love pizza just as much as you love avoiding the realities of adulthood, you might want to put your dollar slice down for a moment and pay attention.

Apparently, there’s an event called “Pizza Camp” in Minneapolis that lets you relive the glorious memories of your childhood while crushing pies on pies of pizza.

Hosted by the Minneapolis Pizza Club and Grown-Up Club, Pizza Camp is basically an adult summer-camp style getaway that features programming and entertainment for pizza-minded individuals.

That’s right. There’s an overnight summer camp that lets you stuff your face with piping hot pizzas in the middle of the wilderness.

And if you ask me, this might be the best thing that has ever happened to outdoor activities.

#pizzacamp2016 #minnesota #grownupclub #mpls #MN

A photo posted by Jasmine Scott (@jazzyscott19) on

That is the face of pure, beaming joy.

When you’re not diving face first into a glorious, cheesy pie, you can participate in a variety of fun camp activities like archery and canoeing.

 

Shooting bullseyes at #pizzacamp2016 #mplspizzaclub #mplspizzacamp

A video posted by Samantha Rae (@srae14) on

The creators of this camp have really hit the bullseye.

Or you can satisfy your appetite for creativity by trying your hand at some pizza-inspired arts and crafts.

Postcards from Pizza Camp! #pizzacamp2016 #icouldonlymakethreeitwashardwork #mpls #grownupclub

A photo posted by Jasmine Scott (@jazzyscott19) on

I FEEL LIKE A KID AGAIN JUST LOOKING AT THIS.

If you’re looking for some entertainment while you eat your beloved slices, the camp programming also features some pretty awesome performances.

 

They love pizza as much as we do!

This place even has a build-your-own pizza station and toppings bar.

You can create the pie of your dreams and cook it yourself in a mobile wood fired pizza oven.

This saucy summer camp costs $125 per pizza lover, and includes programming, a place to stay and your mouthwatering pizza meals.

This pizza lover loved our limited #mplspizzaclub pin! #mplspizzaweek

A photo posted by Minneapolis Pizza Club (@mplspizza.club) on

You even get a Pizza Camp swag bag stuffed with all sorts of goodies like pizza-themed apparel and enamel camp pins.

Unfortunately, this year’s Pizza Camp went down last weekend.

via GIPHY

However, you can start stepping up your pie consumption now in order to prepare for next year’s tasty camping trip.

Written by Kaylin Pound | Elite Daily

Categories
Culture Hit-Or-Miss Video

Watch Irish Folks Try Korean Food For The First Time

The folks over at Facts have gotten pretty adventurous over the last few months, slowly expanding their culinary horizons with each new video. In their latest taste test, the Irish group tries some Korean foods for the first time.

Traditional dishes include Kimchi (pickled cabbage), Haejangguk (hangover beef broth stew), Nakji Bokkeum (spicy stir-fried octopus), Mul-naengmyeon (noodles in an icy soup), and Yumilgwa (a rice confectionary).

As you can see in the video, they’re more receptive to some dishes than others.

Damn, watching them try these foods really makes us crave some good Korean food. Preferably a meal that that won’t burn the roof off our mouths.